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Laura Greggio
Laura Greggio

Laura Greggio

(INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova)

I was born in the nice city of Padova, Italy. There, besides many artistic treasures, including the Giotto frescoes with (perhaps) the first realistic reproduction of a comet,
you can find one of the most ancient Italian Universities, dating back to the 13th century.

I started astronomy almost by chance: what I really was interested into was SCIENCE, and a friend of mine made me notice that astronomy sounded like a fascinating application of both math and physics. I soon discovered that it is indeed, and I really feel privileged to be allowed to call 'work' what is mainly an intellectual game, so pleasing to absorb quite a large fraction of the everyday time.

Towards the end of my university course of studies I was engaged into the stellar evolution theory, courtesy of the university professor who was teaching the subject with great skill and dedication. The mere idea that stars went through a life cycle was very fascinating to me, as well as the fact that we could model this cycle and meet the main observational constraints.

Laura Greggio
Laura Greggio

I got my university degree in Padova in 1979, then studied and worked at the SISSA school in Trieste, and in 1983 I became a researcher at the Astronomy Department in Bologna. Currently I am associate astronomer at the Observatory of Padova. In the last 7 years I have often been a guest of the Observatory of Munich, to collaborate with researchers of Prof. Ralf Bender's group on galaxy formation and evolution.

Since my university degree in 1979 I've been working on the many applications of the stellar evolution theory to galaxies, but I basically recognize myself as an expert in stellar interiors and evolution. My interests include the study of the resolved stellar populations as well as the study of the integrated light from stellar systems.

Using HST has meant a lot of interesting work for me. In particular, it gave me the possibility to extend to distant galaxies the kind of work I was doing on nearby systems, that is interpreting the color-magnitude diagrams in terms of star formation history.