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Ivan King

Ivan King

(University of Washington)

Ivan King received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1952. He was on the faculty of the University of Illinois for several years, and then spent nearly three decades teaching at the University of California at Berkeley, where he retired in 1993. He is now a Research Professor at the University of Washington. He has worked on globular clusters for the entire length of his career. It was he who initiated HST work on NGC 6397; at the time, Adrienne Cool was his postdoc and Jay Anderson his graduate student. The first task was to delineate the color-magnitude diagram of the cluster; next the team used proper motions to remove field stars and push observations down to the lower termination of the main sequence, where low-mass stars are no longer able to burn hydrogen at their centers. This was the first of a series of projects in which Anderson and King developed new techniques of HST astrometry.


Adrienne Cool

Adrienne Cool

Principle Scientist
(SFSU)

Adrienne Cool is a native of New York City, and received her undergraduate degree in physics at Yale University. She spent a few years after college working on medical imaging techniques, and then went to Columbia University where she earned a Master's degree in electrical engineering. During that time she happened on some popular astronomy books and decided that astronomy was for her. Adreinne bought a pair of binoculars, learned the constellations from her rooftop in Brooklyn, and went off to a PhD program in astronomy at Harvard. She came to the San Francisco Bay Area for a postdoc at Berkeley, and has now pretty much adjusted to the ocean being on the wrong side. She is currently an associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at San Francisco State University, where she has enjoyed studying both ordinary and extraordinary stars in globular clusters with many wonderful students.


Josh Grindlay

Josh Grindlay

(Harvard University)

Jonathan (Josh) Grindlay is the Robert Treat Paine Professor of Practical Astronomy at Harvard and is relieved to have just (July, '03) finished his second time around as Department Chair. He has had a long-standing interest in globular clusters as the factories for producing compact X-ray binaries -- all the way back to the primodial days of his discovery of the first X-ray bursts from an accreting neutron star in NGC 6624 using the non-imaging ANS X-ray satellite in 1975. With the Einstein X-ray Observatory he and his student Paul Hertz discovered the large population of low luminosity X-ray sources in globulars and suggested they were dominated by CVs (accreting white dwarfs), but with some quiescent neutron star binaries as well. This has been borne out with followup studies with ROSAT and HST of NGC 6397 with his student Adrienne Cool and now in much higher resolution and more sensitive detail with the recent high resolution studies he and his students and colleagues have conducted with Chandra. From their extensive Chandra (and HST) studies of 47Tuc and other globulars, as well as studies by other groups, it is clear that the Chandra-HST combination is a particularly effective direct probe of compact binary and compact object production and dynamics in globular clusters. When not pursuing the "Practical Astronomy" of stellar collisions, he is now conducting a Chandra galactic plane survey and developing hard X-ray imaging techniques for the ultimate all-sky survey for black holes.


Haldan Cohn

Haldan Cohn

(Indiana University)

Haldan Cohn is a professor of astronomy at Indiana University in Bloomington, where he has been since 1983. He was an undergraduate major in physics at Harvard, where he met his wife Phyllis Lugger, and received his Ph.D. in astrophysics from Princeton in 1979. Following his senior year at Harvard, he worked as a summer student in galactic X-ray astronomy, under the guidance of Josh Grindlay. He held postdoctoral positions at Harvard-Smithsonian, Caltech, and the University of Illinois before joining the Indiana University faculty. A summer astrophysics workshop that Haldan Cohn and Phyllis Lugger attended at the Aspen Institute for Physics in 1983 led to a long-term collaboration with Josh Grindlay, Charles Bailyn, and Adrienne Cool on identifying galactic X-ray binaries, particularly in globular star clusters. His research interests center on theoretical and observational studies of globular clusters, with an emphasis on the core collapse process that leads to extraordinarily high densities at the centers of some clusters, such as NGC 6397, producing ideal conditions for the formation of X-ray binary stars.


Phyllis Lugger

Phyllis Lugger

(Indiana University)

Phyllis Lugger is a professor of astronomy at Indiana University in Bloomington. She received her Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University in 1982, was a postdoctoral fellow at Northwestern University, and an assistant professor at the University of Missouri in Columbia, before becoming an assistant professor at IU in 1984. She was promoted to associate professor in 1988 and to professor in 1995. While a student at Harvard (undergraduate and graduate), she met Josh Grindlay, Charles Bailyn, Adrienne Cool and Haldan Cohn. Her research interests center on the dynamics of stellar systems (globular star clusters, interacting binary stars, galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies). Phyllis Lugger and Haldan Cohn test theoretical predictions of cluster evolution simulations that they run on a GRAPE6 N-body supercomputer at Indiana University, using the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the WIYN Telescope.


Charles Bailyn

Charles Bailyn

(Yale University)

Charles Bailyn is a Professor of Astronomy and Chair of the Department of Astronomy at Yale University. He was an undergraduate at Yale (where he was a classmate of Adrienne Cool, the Principal Investigator of this project) and a graduate student at Harvard (once again a classmate of Adrienne's). After a post-doctoral stint at Harvard's Society of Fellows, he returned to Yale in the guise of a faculty member, albeit one who knew far more than he ought about what students were doing outside of the classroom. His research interests focus on stars in groups, from ultra-compact binary systems to large clusters like Omega Centauri. When not doing research, teaching, or sitting in tiresome committee meetings, he can occasionally be found singing Renaissance madrigals, and/or feigning injury to avoid performing too badly at a variety of athletic endeavors.


Other Collaborators

Craig Sosin (UC Berkeley)
P. Callanan (UCC)

Jay Anders