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Yazan Momany

Yazan Momany

(University of Padua)

Yazan Momany was born in Zerqa, Jordan in 1970, and grew up in Kuwait until age 12. Following a five-year permanence in Jordan, in 1987 he joined the United World College of the Adriatic in Trieste, Italy where he obtained an International Baccalaureate. In 1989, he moved to Bologna where he obtained a degree in Astronomy in 1996, with an M.A. thesis on an almost-known Galactic globular cluster, NGC 4833. In 1998 he moved to Padova where he received his Ph.D., working on Local Group dwarf galaxies. Ever since, a color-image of SagDIG has been his screen-saver. In 2001, and following a 6-month collaboration at the ESO Imaging Survey (Munich), he moved back to Padova, married a beautiful wife and started a postdoc position.

His research interests span a number of scientific fields, including: optical and near-infrared characterization of clusters and dwarf galaxies (anything resolved in stars!), ultraviolet studies of extremely-hot horizontal branch stars in globular clusters, and more recently, Milky Way structure.


Enrico V. Held

Enrico V. Held

(Padua Astronomical Observatory)

Enrico V. Held was born and grew up in Venice. He obtained his Research Doctorate degree at the Padua University in 1987, and soon after he became an astronomer at the Bologna Astronomical Observatory, where he was involved as a member of science teams for the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo.

His main research interests are in stellar populations, galaxies, and their globular cluster systems. It was as a young visiting scientist at Caltech that he discovered dwarf galaxies and their importance for understanding how galaxies were born. His work initially focused on studying the internal dynamics and the star formation of dwarf elliptical galaxies using their integrated light. He thus pointed out that many such galaxies in nearby galaxy clusters are forming stars up to recent times. This research led him naturally to investigations of nearby galaxies that are close enough to us to be resolved into individual stars. In the meantime he had moved to the Padua Astronomical Observatory where he and his collaborators endeavored to study the physical properties of hundreds of thousands stars in dwarf galaxies as a means to infer their histories of star formation and chemical enrichment. Most recently, with the lessons learned from nearby galaxies, he ventured back to the study of dwarf galaxy populations in more distant clusters of galaxies. Outside of astronomy, Enrico likes spending time with Valeria and Giulia, and enjoys mountaineering (especially in the Dolomites) and Venetian rowing on the Lagoon on cold, foggy winter mornings.


I. Saviane

I. Saviane

(European Southern Observatory, La Silla)

I. Saviane was born near Venice in the spring of 1965, although his family comes from the Belluno province in the Dolomites. After his dark ages, he got his Ph.D. in 1997 at the University of Padova, with a thesis on old populations of Local Group galaxies and clusters. In the meantime, he had spent time as a visiting scientist at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias in Tenerife. After receiving his Ph.D., he had several postdoc positions: the first one in Padova and the second at UCLA. During this time, the case of SagDIG stimulated his interest in dwarf irregular galaxies, and he started a project to investigate the luminosity-metallicity relation for such objects. In 2001 he moved to ESO, first as a fellow and later as a staff astronomer, and he's now the head of the IR instrument force at La Silla. Up to now his best-selling paper is the 1999 investigation on the relative ages of Galactic globular clusters. Among other results are the discovery of population II stars in Leo I, and of a young globular cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Recently he revised the distance to the Antennae galaxies, and he's getting some fruits from the dwarf irregulars project.


Michael Rich

Michael Rich

(UCLA)

R. Michael Rich was born in 1957 in Los Angeles, California. He received his B.A. from Pomona College in 1979 and Ph.D. in astronomy from Caltech in 1986 with his thesis advisor, Jermy Mould. Rich was a Carnegie Fellow from 1986-88 and was on the faculty at Columbia University from 1989-1998. He has won the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Fellowship. He is presently an Astronomer (equivalent to tenured Research Professor) at UCLA. Rich is a member of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Science Team and specializes in the study of stellar populations. His Ph.D. students include Neil Tyson and Hongsheng Zhao. In 2002, Rich led a team that used the STIS instrument on HST to discover the first massive black hole in a globular cluster G1, in the Andromeda Galaxy.


Rolly Bedin

Rolly Bedin

(UC Berkeley)

Rolly Bedin was born in 1973 in Padova, Italy. He received his Ph.D. in Astronomy in 2002 from the University of Padova, with the thesis: "HST astrometry of Galactic globular clusters." During his Ph.D. he spent one and a half years as Associate Researcher at the Astronomy Department of the California University in Berkeley. In 2003 he was a postdoc in Padova, and since September 2004 Rolly has been an ESO fellow in Garching. His main research fields involve stellar populations, and extrasolar planets.

 

 


Gullieuszik Marco

Gullieuszik Marco

(University of Padua)

Gullieuszik Marco was born in Padova in 1976, and lives a dozen kilometers from Venice. He is a Ph.D. student at the Padova University, where he took a Laurea degree, defending a thesis based on wide field observations of Galactic globular clusters. At present he is working on Local Group dwarf galaxies. His research fields include both spectroscopic and photometric data observation and analysis, mainly in the infrared spectral range. His main interest however is focused on the resolved stellar populations of Local Group dwarfs, so as to understand the mechanism leading to their chemical evolution and star formation.

 


Luca Rizzi

Luca Rizzi

(Institute for Astronomy / University of Hawaii)

Luca Rizzi was born in Schio, Italy, in 1974. He graduated in astronomy at Padova University, in 1999, with a dissertation on the use of Supernovae Ia as distance indicators. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy at the same university in 2003, defending a thesis on the stellar populations in nearby dwarf galaxies. He is now a junior scientific researcher at the Institute for Astronomy of University of Hawaii, working with Prof. Brent Tully. His main interests lie on stellar populations, distance scale, and galaxies evolution.


Konrad Kuijken

Konrad Kuijken

(Leiden Observatory)

Konrad Kuijken is professor of Galactic Astronomy at Leiden Observatory in the Netherlands, where he researches the distribution of dark matter in our own and other galaxies. He grew up in Belgium and England. After studying applied mathematics
in Cambridge, and obtaining his Ph.D. in astronomy there in 1988, he held a Research Fellowship at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics and then won a Hubble Fellowship at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. In 1994 he moved to the Kapteyn Institute, Groningen in the Netherlands, and in 2002 he took up his present position in Leiden. His research focuses on the mystery of the dark matter, which he does by studying and modeling the motions of objects in and around galaxies, and with gravitational lensing.
He is married, with two daughters.