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Dimitrios Gouliermis

Dimitrios Gouliermis

Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Heidelberg

I was born in Corfu, the beautiful blue-green island of Greece. Since I was a boy I was fascinated by trying to understand how nature works and my first encounter with astronomy was through Carl Sagan's "Cosmos", when I was about 10 years old. Then I decided that I want to learn more about the stars. I studied physics at the University of Athens, Greece, where I continued my Master's and doctoral studies in Astronomy. During my PhD I worked as a research student at the National Observatory of Athens, Greece and the Observatory of the University of Bonn, Germany. After an interruption of almost two years, due to my service in the Hellenic Navy, I returned to Astronomy and started my postdoctoral work in Germany. Since 2003 I am a research associate at the Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg.

My main science interest is on the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, our neighboring dwarf galaxies, and I study their extraordinary variation of young stellar populations. Specifically, I am interested in stellar and dynamical evolution of young star clusters and recent star formation and the Initial Mass Function in stellar associations of these galaxies. I currently co-advise three diploma and one PhD theses from the University of Heidelberg on these subjects.

I enjoy taking pictures, traveling and cooking. My life is constantly happy because of my sweet wife Anthoula.


Wolfgang Brandner

Wolfgang Brandner

Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Heidelberg

Wolfgang Brandner received his PhD from the Julius-Maximilians- University in Wuerzburg, Germany. He then worked as a post-doc at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA. In 1999, he took up a position as assistant astronomer at the University of Hawaii and participated in the commissioning and preparation of science operation of Hokupa'a, the 1st adaptive optics (AO) system on a 8m to 10m class telescope.

In early 2001, he became associate astronomer and adaptive optics instrument scientist at the European Southern Observatory in Garching, Germany, and was responsible for the commissioning of NACO, the 1st AO system for the Very Large Telescope in Chile. Since late 2002, he is a staff scientist at the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany, and currently is also a visiting professor at the University of California, Los Angeles. His main science interests are star formation, and the study of substellar companions to nearby stars.


Thomas Henning

Thomas Henning

Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Heidelberg

Dr. Henning is currently the Director of the Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Heidelberg, Department of Planet and Star Formation. He has also been awarded the Prize for Fundamental Research from the State of Thuringia and has been a member of the Leopoldina Academy since 1999.

Dr. Henning's research interests include star and planet formation, exoplanets, circumstellar disks, physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium, Laboratory Astrophysics, infrared instrumentation. He has also achieved the detection and characterization of protoplanetary disks around young solar-type stars and Brown Dwarfs, multidimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of disk structure and chemistry, detection of the earliest stages of massive stars, first comprehensive characterization of cosmic dust analogues


Andrew Dolphin

Andrew Dolphin

Raytheon Corporation

Dr. Dolphin received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Washington in 1999. He held a postdoc at NOAO from 1999 through 2003, and at the University of Arizona from 2003 through 2006. He is currently working for Raytheon Corporation.

Dr. Dolphin's primary research interests involve the studies of resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies. His research has centered on measuring star formation histories and distances, as well as work on star-forming regions. In addition, Dr. Dolphin has worked on stellar photometry and calibration of WFPC2 and ACS images.


Michael Rosa

Michael Rosa

European Southern Observatory - Germany

Dr. Michael Rosa studied Physics and Astronomy at the University of Heidelberg and the State Observatory Heidelberg, receiving a diploma in Physics in 1978 and a PhD in Astronomy in 1981. From 1982 to 1984 he held a Fellowship at the Garching/Munich Headquarters of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), from where he joined the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF, jointly operated by ESO and the European Space Agency ESA) as an ST Instrument Information Scientist, ESA staff.

In parallel to his scientific investigations (observationally and theoretically) on photoionized nebulae (H II regions) and the evolution of the most massive stars which are generally located in such regions, Michael early on developed a strong interest in the calibration of data from astronomical instrumentation.


Bernhard Brandl

Bernhard Brandl

University Leiden

Dr. Brandl is currently an Associate Professor of Astronomy at Leiden University in the Netherlands.

Dr. Brandl's scientific interests include massive star clusters and starbursts, infrared spectroscopy and instrumentation. He is a member of the instrument teams of Spitzer-IRS, JWST-MIRI and E-ELT-MIDIR.