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Leigh Jenkins

Leigh Jenkins

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center)

Leigh is a NASA Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the X-ray Laboratory at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Leigh received her Ph.D. in Astronomy from the University of Leicester in the UK in 2005, and a Master of Science degree in Astrophysics from University College London in 2001.


Leigh's current research interests involve the study of star formation in nearby galaxies using X-ray (Chandra and XMM-Newton), infrared (Spitzer) and optical (HST) data. This include X-ray binaries, ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), the hot interstellar medium (ISM), supernova remnants and low-luminosity AGN. Leigh has also studied the dwarf galaxy population of the Coma cluster in the near-infrared using the Spitzer Space Telescope.



Optical and X-Ray Observations of NGC 1672

The Hubble image was created from HST data from proposal 10354: Leigh Jenkins (NASA/ GSFC), M. Ward and T. Roberts (University of Durham), A. Levan (University of Hertfordshire), and A. Zezas (Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics).

The team is also observing NGC 1672 with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The science team, along with astronomers N. Brandt (Penn State University) and E. Colbert (Johns Hopkins University) presented the following at the 2006 HEAD meeting of the American Astronomical Society:

New Insights Into The X-ray Properties Of NGC 1672

Abstract: We present the first results of new Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the barred spiral galaxy NGC1672. Previously classified as a Seyfert galaxy, the new combined X-ray imaging and spectral information provides evidence that the nucleus of the galaxy may be almost entirely starburst in nature, presumably triggered and sustained by gas and dust driven to the central region along the galactic bar.