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Andreas Zezas

Andreas Zezas

(Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)

Andreas comes from Athens, Greece. Since his junior high-school years he was keen to understand why our Cosmos is the way it is. This interest naturaly led him to become an Astronomer.

He received his degree in Physics from the University of Patras (Greece), and then moved to Leicester (UK) to pursue his PhD, under the supervision of Martin Ward. He finished his PhD just in time to work with some of the very first detailed images of the X-ray sky, obtained with the Chandra X-ray observatory. Since 2000, he has been an Astrophysicist in the High-Energy Astrophysics Division of the CfA, at the sunnier, but colder Cambridge (USA).

His initial work was on the X-ray properties of other galaxies, and particularly their populations of X-ray binaries (black-hole and neutron star binaries). More recently he has been drifting away to lower energies, and has been using ground based telescopes, as well as the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope, to study the star-formation processes in nearby galaxies and how they relate to the X-ray binary populations.

Other members of Dr. Zezas's science team include K. Gazeas (bio below), G. Fabbiano, A. Prestwich, and M. Garcia (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), J. Gallagher (University of Wisconsin, Madison), J. Miller (University of Michigan), P. Kaaret (University of Iowa), V. Kalogera (Northwestern University), M. Ward (University of Durham), and A. King (University of Leicester).


Kosmas Gazeas

Kosmas Gazeas

(Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)

Kosmas Gazeas received his Masters of Science and PhD in Astrophysics at the University of Athens in Greece. He is currently a postdoc at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

The project he is working on deals with the analysis and interpretation of HST/ACS data of the prototypical spiral galaxy M81. His study focuses in the derivation of a spatially resolved star-formation history and its connection with the galaxy's X-ray source populations, in order to understand the formation and evolution of X-ray binaries.

Other research interests include studies of close binary stars, pulsating and cataclysmic variables, asteroseismology and extrasolar planets. Instrumentation is also one of his favorite topics. During his PhD research he contributed in the field of stellar evolution of contact binaries, by studying the correlations between their physical parameters.

Aside from astronomy, Kosmas' interests include trekking, caving and photography.


John Huchra and son in Italy 1995

John Huchra

(Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)

John Huchra was educated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the California Institute of Technology. He obtained his PhD from Caltech in 1976. He is currently the Senior Advisor to the Provost for Research Policy and a Professor of Astronomy at Harvard University and on staff at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

His research interests include the study the Large-Scale Structure in the Universe, the general study of Observational Cosmology including the determination of the expansion rate, age and fate of the Universe, observations of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), and galactic evolution, particularly star formation in galaxies and globular star cluster systems surrounding other galaxies. He has worked in many areas of astronomy, and especially loves teaching and observing.

Other collaborators on the Hubble ACS data of M81 include P. Barmby, and B. Mcleod (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) and J. Brodie and J. Strader (University of California, Santa Cruz).