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Adrienne Cool

Adrienne Cool

(San Francisco State University)

Adrienne Cool is a native of New York City, and received her undergraduate degree in physics at Yale University. She spent several years after college working on medical imaging techniques, and then went to Columbia University where she earned a Master's degree in electrical engineering. During that time she happened on some popular astronomy books and decided that astronomy was for her. Adrienne bought a pair of binoculars, learned the constellations from her rooftop in Brooklyn, and went off to a Ph.D. program in astronomy at Harvard. She came to the San Francisco Bay Area for a postdoc at Berkeley, and has now pretty much adjusted to the ocean being on the wrong side. She is currently an associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at San Francisco State University, where she has enjoyed studying both ordinary and extraordinary stars in globular clusters with many wonderful students.



Jay Anderson

Jay Anderson

(STScI)

Jay Anderson received his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in 1997 studying mass segregation in globular clusters. Since finishing his degree, he has been focusing on ways to measure accurate positions for stars in Hubble images. The resolving power and stability of HST provide an unprecedented opportunity for differential astrometry in crowded fields, such as globular clusters. Many long-anticipated projects are now possible. These projects include: measuring the bulk motions of satellite galaxies, measuring the plane-of-the-sky rotations of clusters, measuring fundamental distances to clusters by comparing plane-of-the-sky motions with line-of-sight motions, and doing detailed studies of how stars move within clusters.


Charles Bailyn

Charles Bailyn

(Yale University)

Charles Bailyn is a Professor of Astronomy and Chair of the Department of Astronomy at Yale University. He was an undergraduate at Yale (where he was a classmate of Adrienne Cool and a graduate student at Harvard. After a post-doctoral stint at Harvard's Society of Fellows, he returned to Yale in the guise of a faculty member, albeit one who knew far more than he ought about what students were doing outside of the classroom. His research interests focus on stars in groups, from ultra-compact binary systems to large clusters like Omega Centauri. When not doing research, teaching, or sitting in tiresome committee meetings, he can occasionally be found singing Renaissance madrigals, and/or feigning injury to avoid performing too badly at a variety of athletic endeavors.


Jeff Carlin

Jeff Carlin

(San Francisco State University)

Jeff Carlin is an undergraduate senior studying Astrophysics, with a Mathematics minor, at San Francisco State University. He was originally a Fine Arts major at the University of Kansas, but this didn't satisfy his curious nature, so after moving to San Francisco, he changed majors to Astrophysics. Starting in early 2001, Jeff began research on the Hubble Space Telescope images that were used to create the Hubble Heritage image of Omega Centauri, attempting to identify optical counterparts for the X-ray sources found by Daryl Haggard and Adrienne Cool in this cluster. Jeff also plans to participate in an observing run to Kitt Peak, Arizona later this fall to do follow-up observations of an optical counterpart of a field binary star system located via X-ray data. Jeff has enjoyed his research experience thus far, and looks forward to continuing research in a Ph.D. program beginning in the Fall 2002 semester. Jeff's hobbies include playing guitar and drums and attending as many Giants and A's baseball games as possible.


Peter Edmonds

Peter Edmonds

(Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)

Peter Edmonds grew up in the town of Albury, in the Australian countryside. He studied science at the University of Sydney as an undergraduate, followed by a Ph.D., also at the University of Sydney, where he studied pulsating stars using the Anglo-Australian Telescope. After losing too many battles with clouds he was keen to change over to space-based observing. He moved to Baltimore, Maryland for a postdoc at the Space Telescope Science Insitute, where he developed an interest in binary stars, globular clusters and Hubble Space Telescope observations, followed by a postdoc at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). Currently he is working in the Education and Public Outreach group at CfA advertising the wonderful science done with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. His main research interests continue to be binaries and globular clusters, with an emphasis on HST and Chandra observations.


Jonathan Grindlay

Jonathan Grindlay

(Harvard University)

Jonathan Grindlay is the Paine Professor of Astronomy at Harvard and current Chair of the Harvard Department of Astronomy. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1971, was a Harvard Junior Fellow through 1974, then a research scientist at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory before joining the Harvard faculty as Assistant Professor in 1976. He was promoted to Professor in 1981, and Paine Professor in 2001. His primary research interests are in high energy astrophysics and the study of compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes) in x-ray binaries. A particularly long-standing interest and activity is the study of compact binaries in globular clusters, from the early days of x-ray astronomy through present observations with HST and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. He is fortunate to have supervised the thesis research of a number of students in this work, including Professors Cool and Bailyn.


Daryl Haggard

Daryl Haggard

(University of Washington)

Daryl Haggard is a first year graduate student in physics at San Francisco State University. She received her undergraduate degree in Classics at St. John's College in Santa Fe, N.M. Daryl's research at SFSU involves looking at the giant star cluster Omega Centauri using NASA's newest orbiting X-ray observatory, Chandra. With Chandra's high resolution at X-ray wavelengths she pinpoints possible binary stars, including cataclysmic variables that are predicted to form in the cluster. With accurate X-ray positions in hand, her collaborators at SFSU and at Yale are using these Hubble Space Telescope data as well as ground-based images to identify the stars that are emitting the X-rays. The goal is to classify the binaries, thereby helping to constrain current theories of stellar interactions in globular clusters. As a NSF GK-12 fellow, Daryl also spends part of her time working on inquiry-based science with middle school students in San Francisco.