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Rupali Chandar

Rupali Chandar

(University of Toledo)

Rupali Chandar received an undergraduate degree in Physics and Astronomy from Haverford College, and her Ph.D from Johns Hopkins University in 2000. She is currently an assistant professor of astronomy at the University of Toledo. Before going to Toledo, she worked at the Space Telescope Science Institute and studied nearby starburst galaxies from far- and near- ultraviolet STIS spectroscopy. Additional research interests involve characterizing the young, massive star cluster populations in late-type galaxies, and their relationship to the super star clusters found in starbursts.

In January 2009, Dr. Chandar gave a lecture on star clusters in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC): "As two of the nearest, late-type galaxies, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are an important testing ground for understanding the formation and evolution of star clusters. Both the LMC and the SMC have formed massive star clusters with ages from a few million years to older than 10 billion years. We present new results for the age and mass distributions of star clusters younger than ~a billion years in the Magellanic Clouds. We also examine the properties of ancient globular clusters in the LMC. These results lead to a new picture for the lifecycle of star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds."


Kip Kuntz

Kip Kuntz

(JHU/GSFC)

Kip Kuntz is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate with the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy of The Johns Hopkins University and his office is in the X-ray Laboratory of the Exploration of the Universe Division of the Goddard Space Flight Center. I work with data from ROSAT, Chandra, Hubble, and XMM.

Dr. Kuntz received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2000. He has Masters and Bachelors of Science degrees from the University of Hawaii, Manoa and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, respectively. His current research interests involve the study of the hot Galactic Interstellar Medium (ISM) using X-rays.