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Catherine Kaleida

Catherine Kaleida

(Arizona State University)

Catherine Kaleida is an astrophysics graduate student in the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona.

Her research focuses on stellar clustering at all size scales, from compact clusters to large stellar complexes, and the role those stellar groupings play in galaxy structure and evolution. She received a Bachelor of Science in Physics and Astronomy and a Bachelor of Arts in Studio Art from the University of Georgia in 2004.

Upon finishing her Ph.D.in the fall of 2011, Catherine will be moving on to the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in La Serena, Chile, where she will be a Postdoctoral Research Associate in charge of summer student programs. Recently, she has been developing an automated method to select stellar groupings of all size scales, and testing this method on the star clusters and stellar associations in NGC 4214.

Catherine spends her free time rock climbing, making metal sculptures, salsa dancing, knitting, and attempting to grow vegetables in her backyard.


Robert O'Connell

Robert O'Connell

(University of Virginia)

Robert W. O'Connell is J. D. Hamilton Professor of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. He grew up in San Francisco and received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California at Berkeley and the California Institute of Technology. He has been at UVa since 1971, where he served as departmental chair for a total of 11 years. Dr. O'Connell's main research interests center on the evolution of galaxies as revealed by their stellar populations, especially in unusual environments such as starbursts and cooling flows in clusters of galaxies. He has published over 200 scientific papers. He has long been active in space astronomy, especially observations in the ultraviolet, and served as chair of the international science working group for the Starlab project and as a co-investigator on the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope, which flew on two Space Shuttle missions in the 1990's. Dr. O'Connell has been chair of the Scientific Oversight Committee for the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope since 1998.

The members of the WFC3 Science Oversight Committee and Early Release Science, which includes observations of M83 include: R. O'Donnell (University of Virginia), B. Balick (University of Washington), H. Bond (STScI), D. Calzetti (University of Massachusetts), M. Carollo (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich), M. Disney (University of Wales, College of Cardiff), M. Dopita (Australian National University), J. Frogel (Ohio State University Research Foundation) , D. Hall (University of Hawaii), J. Holtzman (New Mexico State University), P. McCarthy (Carnegie Institution of Washington), F. Paresce (European Southern Observatory, Germany), A.Saha (NOAO/AURA) , J. Silk (University of Oxford), A. Walker (NOAO/CTIO) , B. Whitmore (STScI), R. Windhorst (Arizona State University), and E. Young (University of Arizona).


Michael Dopita

Michael Dopita

(Australian National University)

Michael Andrew Dopita is Professor and ARC Federation Fellow at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University. The School is located at Mount Stromlo Observatory, the home of the Hubble Space Telescope. *Dopita is one of the top international authorities in the general area of interstellar astrophysics. He has made fundamental contributions to research on astrophysical plasma diagnostics, star formation in galaxies, the physics of planetary nebulae, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei and radio jets. His prestige and judgement were recognized by his appointment to the Hubble Space Telescope Time Assignment Committee.


Brad Whitmore

Brad Whitmore

(Space Telescope Science Institute)

Brad Whitmore is an astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Maryland. He specializes in collisions between galaxies and the star clusters that form during these collisions. He received his PhD in astronomy at the University of Michigan in 1980, was a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism until 1982, taught at Arizona State University in 1983, and has been at STScI ever since. His contributions range from helping to design the observing proposal system at STScI, being the group lead for the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Group, and the Division Head for the Instrument Divsion. His present position is Deputy Division Head of the Science Division.

Brad's "outside" interests include hiking, mountain climbing, adventure racing, and orienteering, where he has been the national champion in his age groups three times. He lives on a small hobby farm with his wife Julie, four llamas, a dozen sheep, thirty chickens, eight cats, and their English springer Plum. His son Ian is an established artist in Washington DC, and his daughter Jocelyn is a student at the Center for Cartoon Studies in Vermont.