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William (Bill) Goff

(Sutter Creek, CA)

Bill Goff is a retired state worker who became interested in astronomy in the 1960's. In the 1980's he joined the AAVSO and began visual observing of variables. In recent years he began using a CCD and observing variables in their faintest state. When the Hubble Andromeda Cepheid challenge was announced by AAVSO, Bill knew it was right up his alley. He managed to make enough observations to see a clear light curve for the object. The object was observed from his backyard using a telescope on a mounting he built himself.

 

William (Bill) Goff

Steve Smith

(Sonoma, CA)

Steve Smith is an contemporary classical music composer living in Sonoma, California. He received a doctorate in music composition from the University of Miami where he subsequently taught for several years before moving to California to pursue composing full time. He became interested in astronomy in 2007 through taking classes at the Robert Ferguson Observatory in Kenwood, California; following the classes, he became a docent at the observatory where he participates in public outreach, education, and research projects. He headed the observatory's effort to upgrade its CCD system which he then used to observe M31-V1 and submit data to the AAVSO.

Steve Smith

Arne Henden

(AAVSO Director)

Arne Henden is the Director of the American Association of Variable Star Observers.  He holds a Ph.D. in Astronomy from Indiana University.  He came to the AAVSO from the U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station. While a Senior Research Scientist at NOFS, Arne specialized in optical and near-IR imaging systems, working on variable stars, brown dwarfs, and all-sky photometric calibration.


During his years at NOFS, Arne emerged as one of the premier mentors of amateur astronomers, especially those interested in variable stars and minor planet astrometry.   He has given talks and workshops world-wide on observing techniques and professional-amateur collaboration.

Arne Henden

Richard Sabo

(Bozeman, MT)

Dr. Richard Sabo is a native of Bozeman, Montana, a retired surgeon and past president of the American College of Surgeons.  He became interested in astronomy while camping with his daughter 15 years ago.  After joining the Southwestern Montana Astronomical Society, the local astronomy club, in 1997 he obtained his Honorary Messier Club Certificate from the Astronomical League in 2000.  He has been active in club activities including giving talks, participating is public star parties in Bozeman, Yellowstone Park and at local schools.  He is experienced in astrophotography and CCD photometry.  His primary interests have been cataclysmic variable and RR Lyrae stars.

He is a member of the Astronomical League, The American Association of Variable Star Observers, the British Astronomical Association and the Society of Astronomical Science and is the Past President of the Southwestern Montana Astronomical Society.

Richard Sabo

Gary Walker

(South Yarmouth, MA)

Gary Walker is an Aeronautical Engineer, and spent 31 years in the defense business designing navigation equipment for Northrop Corporation. He was later employed at Maxtor Corporation, where he was responsible for the advanced technologies of spindles and computer fluid dynamics. Gary has spent the last 30 years observing, building telescopes and observatories, photographing the heavens, and making photometric measurements of various variable stars utilizing CCD cameras. He is a past president of the AAVSO (1997-1999) and he currently holds the office of secretary of the organization.

Gary is currently the Telescope Engineer and Astronomer at the Maria Mitchell Observatory for its REU Program.

Gary Walker

Robert Buchheim

(Coto De Caza, CA)

By day, Robert K. Buchheim is a program manager and writer. By night he will be found in his backyard observatory. His particular joys are introducing children to the night sky, and encouraging amateur astronomers to participate in small-telescope research projects. He has a BS in Physics from Arizona State University, and is a graduate of Defense Systems Management College and the UCLA Executive Program. He has been a member of the Orange County Astronomers for 25 years (and is currently the Secretary of that fine organization), is a member of the International Occultation Timing Association, the American Association of Variable Star Observers, and is on the Board of the Society for Astronomical Sciences. His book The Sky Is Your Laboratory is a manual for research-oriented amateur astronomers. Mr. Buchheim was awarded the G. Bruce Blair award of the Western Amateur Astronomers in 2010. Before participating in this M31-V1 AAVSO project, he never would have guessed that a backyard astronomer could see and measure a single star in another galaxy!

Robert Buchheim

Special Thanks to
AAVSO Observers:

  • Gergana Belcheva, Sofia, Bulgaria
  • Tim Crawford, Arch Cape, Oregon
  • Michael Cook, Newcastle, ON, Canada
  • Shawn Dvorak, Clermont, Florida
  • Barabara Harris, New Smyra Beach, Florida
  • and Mathew Templeton, Science Director, AAVSO