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Sugata Kaviraj

Sugata Kaviraj

(University of Oxford)

Dr. Sugata Kaviraj's research involves mapping the evolution of the galaxy population over cosmic time. He uses multi-wavelength data (spanning the ultra-violet to the far-infrared) to quantify the assembly of stellar mass in galaxies and study the evolution of the visible Universe over the last 8-10 billion years.

With his groups at Imperial College London (where he was a postdoc) and University of Oxford, his recent work includes the study of elliptical galaxies, extra-galactic star clusters, post-starburst galaxies, the role that active galaxies play in galaxy evolution, and luminous infrared galaxies.

He is currently a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, Oxford. He was recently awarded the 2011 Royal Astronomical Society ‘A’ Winton Capital award for research that focused on the stellar populations and evolution of early-type (elliptical) galaxies, analyzing them in ultraviolet light using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Significantly, he found that rather than being ‘red and dead’ objects, they contain significant populations of young and intermediate age stars.


Mark Crockett

Mark Crockett

(University of Oxford)

Dr. Mark Crockett is an astrophysicist currently working on Galaxy Evolution studies at the Univiersity of Oxford, UK. His work is focused on early-type systems and, in particular, the role which galaxy mergers play in their formation and evolution.

Mark is originally from Kilrea in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. He studied Physics at Queen's University Belfast, before obtaining a Ph.D. in Astrophysics from the same institution in 2009. His Ph.D. research focussed on the detection and characterization of core-collapse supenovae progenitors - the massive stars which end their lives in colossal supernova explosions - and he continues to be involved in this work.


Joseph Silk

Joseph Silk

(University of Oxford)

Dr. Joseph Silk is the Savilian Professor of Astronomy and Head of the Astrophysics Department at the University of Oxford. He was previously a Professor of Astronomy at the University of California at Berkeley. He holds a B.A. in Mathematics from Clare College, Cambridge, and a Ph.D. in Astronomy from Harvard University. Dr. Silk is the author or co-author of many refereed journal articles, conference papers and popular articles and books, including The Left Hand of Creation (with John D. Barrow) and A Short History of the Universe. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Research Interests Dr. Silk's research interests are in theoretical cosmology, seeking insights about dark matter, galaxy formation, and the cosmic microwave background. With his research group, he pioneered predictions of the temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background, and has made important contributions to the study of possible signatures for dark matter detection.


Robert O'Connell

Robert O'Connell

(University of Virginia)

Robert W. O'Connell is J. D. Hamilton Professor of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. He grew up in San Francisco and received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California at Berkeley and the California Institute of Technology. He has been at UVa since 1971, where he served as departmental chair for a total of 11 years. Dr. O'Connell's main research interests center on the evolution of galaxies as revealed by their stellar populations, especially in unusual environments such as starbursts and cooling flows in clusters of galaxies. He has published over 200 scientific papers. He has long been active in space astronomy, especially observations in the ultraviolet, and served as chair of the international science working group for the Starlab project and as a co-investigator on the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope, which flew on two Space Shuttle missions in the 1990's. Dr. O'Connell has been chair of the Scientific Oversight Committee for the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope since 1998.

The members of the WFC3 Science Oversight Committee and Early Release Science, which includes observations of M83 include: R. O'Donnell (University of Virginia), B. Balick (University of Washington), H. Bond (STScI), D. Calzetti (University of Massachusetts), M. Carollo (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich), M. Disney (University of Wales, College of Cardiff), M. Dopita (Australian National University), J. Frogel (Ohio State University Research Foundation) , D. Hall (University of Hawaii), J. Holtzman (New Mexico State University), P. McCarthy (Carnegie Institution of Washington), F. Paresce (European Southern Observatory, Germany), A.Saha (NOAO/AURA) , J. Silk (University of Oxford), A. Walker (NOAO/CTIO) , B. Whitmore (STScI), R. Windhorst (Arizona State University), and E. Young (University of Arizona).