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Danny Lennon

Daniel (Danny) Lennon

(ESA/STScI)

Born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Danny was awarded his Ph.D in 1984 from The Queen's University of Belfast. The award of a Royal Society European Exchange Fellowship at the Universitaets-Sternwarte of Munich in 1989 lead to his appointment as Research Scientist from 1991-1998, exploring the spectra of massive stars in nearby galaxies, and exploiting the newly launched Hubble Space Telescope.

In 1998, he was appointed Head of Astronomy at the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes in La Palma, Canary Islands. In 2008, he accepted a European Space Agency position of Instrument Scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, at the time of the fifth Hubble servicing mission. He supported the commissioning of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and the re-commissioning of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. In 2010, he was appointed Head of the Instruments Division at STScI. A spectroscopist by nature, Danny has recently begun to exploit the power of Hubble to perform high precision astrometry and measure proper motions of very massive runaway stars.


Elena Sabbi with daughter Luce


Elena Sabbi

(ESA/STScI)

Elena was born and raised in Bologna, Italy. She received her PhD in 2005 at the University of Bologna studying the effects of dynamics on stellar evolution in globular clusters.

Elena is interested in the questions of how star formation occurs, how it is affected by local and global conditions, how different dynamic conditions may influence the evolution of a stellar population, and how the evolution of stellar populations impacts the chemical evolution of galaxies. In pursuing these goals, she has investigated simple stellar populations, such as young star forming regions and old globular clusters, and more complex stellar populations, such as those commonly found in nearby dwarf galaxies.


Selma de Mink

Selma de Mink

(STScI)

Selma de Mink was born in the Netherlands and studied physics and mathematics at the University of Utrecht. After an internship in Spain at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, she decided to continue in Astronomy. Before starting the Ph.D. program at Utrecht she took some time off to to study Spanish and work as volunteer teaching English and astronomy at a primary school in a small, remote village in Guatemala. In 2010 she graduated cum laude from Utrecht and was awarded a NASA Hubble Fellowship. After spending some time at the Argelander Institute in Bonn, Germany, she moved to the United States. Selma’s main expertise is in computer simulations of the evolution of massive stars towards their death. In particular, she is interested in the effects of rotation, interacting binary systems, star clusters and the earliest stellar generations that formed in Universe. While her background is in theoretical work, she is closely involved in various observing programs with the Very Large Telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope.


Jay Anderson

Jay Anderson

(STScI)

Jay Anderson received his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in 1997 studying mass segregation in globular clusters. He has been at the Institute since 2007. His research has been focused on ways to measure accurate positions for stars in Hubble images. The resolving power and stability of HST provide an unprecedented opportunity for differential astrometry in crowded fields, such as globular clusters. Many long-anticipated projects are now possible, such as measuring the bulk motions of satellite galaxies, determining the origin of hypervelocity stars, searching for intermediate-mass black holes in clusters, and studying in detail how stars move within clusters.

 


Roeland van der Marel

Roeland van der Marel

(STScI)

Roeland van der Marel was born in the Netherlands. He obtained degrees in astronomy and mathematics at Leiden University. He is now a tenured astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), as well as an Adjunct Professor at nearby Johns Hopkins University. Roeland has led teams dealing with the scientific operations of Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys, and dealing with the telescope structure and focus for both Hubble and its planned successor, the James Webb Space Telescope. Roeland is an expert on black holes and the structure of galaxies. To study these topics, he combines Hubble Space Telescope observations of galaxies with theoretical models based on the laws of physics.


Nolan Walborn

Nolan Walborn

(STScI)

Nolan Walborn is a native of Pennsylvania but lived in Argentina for 8 years prior to graduating from the American Community High School in Buenos Aires. He did his undergraduate studies at Gettysburg College with a major in physics, followed by graduate work at the Yerkes Observatory of the University of Chicago, where he obtained his PhD in astronomy in 1970. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the David Dunlap Observatory of the University of Toronto, he returned to Latin America for an 8-year staff appointment at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. Following a National Research Council senior fellowship at the Goddard Space Flight Center, he joined the scientific staff of the Space Telescope Science Institute in 1984, where he is currently an Instrument Scientist for the spectrographs on the Hubble Space Telescope. His research interests are the optical and ultraviolet spectra of hot, massive (OB-type) stars and the giant nebulae of the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds in which they are formed.


Chris Evans

Chris Evans

(STFC, Edinburgh, UK)

Chris Evans is based at the UK Astronomy Technology Centre in Edinburgh. He received his Ph.D. from University College London in 2001, spent three years as a post-doc in La Palma, then moved north to Scotland to work on instrumentation and scientific simulations for the European Extremely Large Telescope. His research focusses on the evolution of massive stars,with Chris spending much of his time exploring the high-mass stellar populations of the Magellanic Clouds. He is the principal investigator of the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey, a large project using the Very Large Telescope in northern Chile which has obtained spectroscopy of 1000 of the luminous stars in 30 Doradus.