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Alessandra Aloisi

Alessandra Aloisi

(STScI)

Alessandra Aloisi was born and raised in Bologna, Italy. She received both a "laurea" degree and a Ph.D. degree from Bologna University. Then in 1999 she moved to Baltimore in the USA, where she has worked since. Following a postdoctoral position at Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) and an Associate Research Scientist position at Johns Hopkins University, she permanently joined STScI in 2003, originally as employee of the European Space Agency (ESA) and more recently as AURA research staff. During her tenure at STScI, she was an Instrument Scientist for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), and then the lead of the STScI Team for STIS and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). She is currently the Deputy Division Head of the Operations and Engineering Division at STScI, where she performs astronomical research and supports the missions of the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope.

Alessandra is an expert on the subject of star-forming galaxies, which she has approached both from the theoretical and the observational point of view. Her research focuses on the measurement and interpretation of the stellar and metal content, star-formation history and evolution of these galaxies. She is a regular user of Hubble and continues to be fascinated by its tremendous powers, both for scientific inquiry and for revealing the beauty of the cosmos. "The wonderful Hubble images I have had the fortune of working with since the beginning of my astronomical journey," Alessandra says, "have strengthened the conviction in me that I did not choose this professional field by chance: the love for astronomy has always been inside me as a strong desire to discover knew worlds and understand the reasons for their existence."


Francesca Annibalii

Francesca Annibali

(INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna)

Francesca Annibali received a "laurea" degree in Astronomy in 2001 from Bologna University. She then obtained a Ph.D. in Astrophysics in 2005 from the International School for Advanced Studiesin Trieste.

After school she was a postdoc at Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore and then at the National Institute of Astrophysics/Astronomical Observatory of Bologna (INAF). She is currently on staff there now as an astronomer.

Her astronomical interests focus on stellar populations in galaxies, young star-forming dwarf galaxies and massive old ones, both from the theoretical and observational point of view. Her research focuses on the interpretation of the stellar and metal content in galaxies as a tool to understand how they form and evolve.


Aaron Grocholski

Aaron Grocholski

(Louisiana State University and A & M College)

Aaron Grocholski earned his B.S. in Physics from Georgia Southern University. He then went to the University of Florida where he worked for Dr. Ata Sarajedini studying star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Aaron earned his M.S. in Astronomy in 2002 and Ph.D. in 2006. After working as a postdoctoral research assistant with Roeland van der Marel and Alessandra Aloisi at the Space Telescope Science Institute, he went to Louisiana State University and A & M College where he is an Instructor in the Separtment of Physics and Astronomy.

Aaron's research focuses on the use of photometry and spectroscopy of resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies to determine the properties of those galaxies, such as their distance, structure and star formation history.


Jennifer Mack

Jennifer Mack

(STScI)

Jennifer Mack is a Research and Instrument Scientist at the Space Telescope Institute where she is actively involved in both science research and instrument calibration for HST. Jennifer received her Bachelor's degree in physics from the University of Denver in 1993 and her Master's in astrophysics from the University of Minnesota in 1996.

Shortly thereafter, she moved to Maryland for an opportunity to work with the awe-inspiring images of the Hubble Telescope. She is currently a member of the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument team where she works on flat fielding and photometric calibration of the detectors. Outside of astronomy, Jennifer enjoys being a mom to a rambunctious toddler, playing her guitar, camping, and nature photography.


Marco Sirianni

Marco Sirianni

(ESO/ESTEC)

Marco was born and raised in Padova, Italy. His love of astronomy started at about the age of 7 when he started playing around with a very small (~ 1") Galilean telescope. He grew up with the classical 60mm refractor in the backyard.

Marco received the laura degree in astronomy at the University of Padova in 1994 when he started his scientific collaboration with STScI. In 1998 he moved to Baltimore to start his collaboration with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Team at the Johns Hopkins University (JHU).

In 1999 he obtained his Ph.D. in space science and technology from the Center of Studies and Activities for Space of the University of Padova. He was employed at JHU as a post doc first and as Associate Researach Scientist as member of the ACS team working on the detector team and being involved in the ground and on-orbit calibration of the instrument.

In October 2003 he started working for the European Space Agency in the Research and Scientific Support Department at the Space Telescope Science Institute where he is currently lead of the ACS and WFPC2 team. He played a major role in the photometric calibration of ACS and he is interested in the effects of the radiation damage in space-operated CCDs.

Marco's research interests are in the are of the low mass star population in young clusters in the Magellanic Clouds, Starburst Galaxies and Super Star Clusters.


Monica Tosi

Monica Tosi

(INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna)

Monica Tosi received her “laurea” degree in Astronomy in Rome and then went to Yale, with an Italian fellowship. "I chose Yale because a good friend advised me that there I could work with "the best person to learn how to do work in astronomy"- Beatrice Tinsley. Beatrice gave me both the cultural bases and the technical tools to work on the chemical evolution of galaxies, which is still one of my major research fields. Even more importantly, perhaps, she introduced me to the "woman's approach to astronomy."

Back to Italy, she received a position at the Bologna Observatory, where I'm still working now as a full professor. She works on galaxy evolution, both from the theoretical and the observational points of view, interpreting observational data on star clusters and galaxies, deriving star formation histories, and computing chemical evolution models for galaxies of different morphological types.


Roeland van der Marel

Roeland van der Marel

(STScI)

Roeland van der Marel obtained degrees in astronomy and mathematics at Leiden University after which NASA awarded him a Hubble Fellowship to come to the United States to continue his research.

In three years at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton he became a frequent user of the Hubble Space Telescope. He then moved to Baltimore, where he is now a tenured member of the scientific staff at STScI, as well as an Adjunct Professor at Johns Hopkins University.

At STScI Roeland previously led a team in charge of the scientific operations of Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys and Second Wide Field and Planetary Camera. He now manages a team that studies the telescope structure and focus for both Hubble and its planned successor, the James Webb Space Telescope. Roeland is an expert on black holes and the structure of galaxies. To study these topics he combines Hubble Space Telescope observations of galaxies with theoretical models based on the laws of physics.